Ready for Harvest: Clearcutting in the Southern Appalachians

$25.00$150.00

NOW AVAILABLE ON DVD FOR THE FIRST TIME

Directed by: Anne Lewis
1994
Running Time: 28:00
Color

Beginning in the late 1800’s, and continuing into the early decades of the 20th century, forests in the Southern Appalachian Mountains were extensively logged. Since that time, the forests have grown back and matured. These hardwood stands of hickory, oak, black cherry, and walnut are attracting timber companies to private land and national forests. The U.S. Forest Service sells the trees on these public tracts for prices well below market value. In most cases, companies choose to harvest these tracts by clear cutting the entire area.

Ready for Harvest explores the complex questions of how we use and protect our native forests. Footage includes interviews with Walton Smith, who has practiced sound forest management techniques for more than 60 years; Betty Ballew, whose community was dislocated because other people wanted to use the land for their own purposes; and Chuck Crow, a Cherokee who ahs seen the short-term gains and long-term losses to communities when the forests that surround them are stripped of trees. Mary Kelly, an ecologist, explains the importance of biological diversity to a healthy ecosystem.

On the other side, the U.S. Forest Service has promoted management practices that discourage growth of non-commercial species, such as dogwood and red maple. timber companies, citing the Forest Service’s expertise, harvest trees primarily by clear-cutting because it is more economical than selective cutting.

Ready for Harvest is meant to encourage debate about a forest management policy that affects the environment, the economy, and a culture.

Ready for Harvest explores the complex questions of how we use and protect our native forests. Footage includes interviews with Walton Smith, who has practiced sound forest management techniques for more than 60 years; Betty Ballew, whose community was dislocated because other people wanted to use the land for their own purposes; and Chuck Crow, a Cherokee who ahs seen the short-term gains and long-term losses to communities when the forests that surround them are stripped of trees. Mary Kelly, an ecologist, explains the importance of biological diversity to a healthy ecosystem.

On the other side, the U.S. Forest Service has promoted management practices that discourage growth of non-commercial species, such as dogwood and red maple. timber companies, citing the Forest Service’s expertise, harvest trees primarily by clear-cutting because it is more economical than selective cutting.

Reviews

“… a factually sound and emotionally stimulating video presentation of a major issue …” – Edward C. Fritz, Forest Reform Network

“… brings fresh insight into the shady dealings of the U.S. Forest Service.” – San Francisco Environmental Film Festival

“Excellent.” – Rich Green, Kentucky Division of Forestry

“A unique portrayal of the environmental and cultural impact of clear cutting.” – William H. Gillespie, State Forester (retired), West Virginia

“A powerful and scary film.” – Anne Radford Phillips, Cooperation Extension Services, North Carolina State University, Raleigh

“Stimulated lots of discussion in the classroom about government policies and clear cutting procedures and the effects of both on the environment.” – Dr. James Norwood, Agriculture Science, East Texas University

“Should motivate all viewers to help stop the forest destruction happening in their own backyards.” – Steve Fesenmaier, Director, West Virginia Library Commission

Screenings & Festivals

North American Association for Environmental Education Film and Video Festival – Best of Show

San Francisco Environmental Film Festival – Screening

Charlotte Film Festival – Screening

Athens International Film Festival – Screening

Vermont [EarthPeace] International Film Festival – Semi-Finalist

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Description

NOW AVAILABLE ON DVD FOR THE FIRST TIME

Directed by: Anne Lewis
1994
Running Time: 28:00
Color

Beginning in the late 1800’s, and continuing into the early decades of the 20th century, forests in the Southern Appalachian Mountains were extensively logged. Since that time, the forests have grown back and matured. These hardwood stands of hickory, oak, black cherry, and walnut are attracting timber companies to private land and national forests. The U.S. Forest Service sells the trees on these public tracts for prices well below market value. In most cases, companies choose to harvest these tracts by clear cutting the entire area.

Ready for Harvest explores the complex questions of how we use and protect our native forests. Footage includes interviews with Walton Smith, who has practiced sound forest management techniques for more than 60 years; Betty Ballew, whose community was dislocated because other people wanted to use the land for their own purposes; and Chuck Crow, a Cherokee who ahs seen the short-term gains and long-term losses to communities when the forests that surround them are stripped of trees. Mary Kelly, an ecologist, explains the importance of biological diversity to a healthy ecosystem.

On the other side, the U.S. Forest Service has promoted management practices that discourage growth of non-commercial species, such as dogwood and red maple. timber companies, citing the Forest Service’s expertise, harvest trees primarily by clear-cutting because it is more economical than selective cutting.

Ready for Harvest is meant to encourage debate about a forest management policy that affects the environment, the economy, and a culture.

Ready for Harvest explores the complex questions of how we use and protect our native forests. Footage includes interviews with Walton Smith, who has practiced sound forest management techniques for more than 60 years; Betty Ballew, whose community was dislocated because other people wanted to use the land for their own purposes; and Chuck Crow, a Cherokee who ahs seen the short-term gains and long-term losses to communities when the forests that surround them are stripped of trees. Mary Kelly, an ecologist, explains the importance of biological diversity to a healthy ecosystem.

On the other side, the U.S. Forest Service has promoted management practices that discourage growth of non-commercial species, such as dogwood and red maple. timber companies, citing the Forest Service’s expertise, harvest trees primarily by clear-cutting because it is more economical than selective cutting.

Reviews

“… a factually sound and emotionally stimulating video presentation of a major issue …” – Edward C. Fritz, Forest Reform Network

“… brings fresh insight into the shady dealings of the U.S. Forest Service.” – San Francisco Environmental Film Festival

“Excellent.” – Rich Green, Kentucky Division of Forestry

“A unique portrayal of the environmental and cultural impact of clear cutting.” – William H. Gillespie, State Forester (retired), West Virginia

“A powerful and scary film.” – Anne Radford Phillips, Cooperation Extension Services, North Carolina State University, Raleigh

“Stimulated lots of discussion in the classroom about government policies and clear cutting procedures and the effects of both on the environment.” – Dr. James Norwood, Agriculture Science, East Texas University

“Should motivate all viewers to help stop the forest destruction happening in their own backyards.” – Steve Fesenmaier, Director, West Virginia Library Commission

Screenings & Festivals

North American Association for Environmental Education Film and Video Festival – Best of Show

San Francisco Environmental Film Festival – Screening

Charlotte Film Festival – Screening

Athens International Film Festival – Screening

Vermont [EarthPeace] International Film Festival – Semi-Finalist

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